CFP: Conference „Smelling“ of the British Animal Studies Network

At the meetings of the British Animal Studies Network held at the University of Strathclyde over the past three years we have been engaging with the senses: with the bodily engagement with the material world that on some levels we share with animals, and that distinguish animals from us, and from each other, in some remarkable and telling ways. Following on the heels of ‘Looking’, ‘Feeling’ and ‘Tasting’, ‘Smelling’ invites thinking about the smell of animals (their aromas); animals’ smelling powers (their capacities); and human engagement (or lack of it) with smell. Invited speakers confirmed for this meeting are Andrew Gardiner (Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh) and Sandra Swart (History, Stellenbosch University, South Africa).

As well as these invited speakers we are also issuing this call for papers. If you are interested in giving a paper addressing the topic from whatever disciplinary perspective please submit your title, with an abstract of no more than 200 words and a brief biography (also of no more than 200 words). These should be included within your email – i.e. not as attachments. Please send them to erica.fudge. The deadline for abstracts is Friday 15 January 2016. Presentations will be 20 minutes long, and we hope to include work by individuals at different career stages. Sadly we have no money to support travel, accommodation or attendance costs.

Topics covered at this meeting might include (but are not limited to):

· the smell of animals (the aroma they give off) and how that is controlled
· different cultural understandings of animals’ capacity to smell
· the scenting capacity of animals, and human uses of that capacity
· the (im)possibility of representing the ability to smell in discourse and its implications for some animals
· smell and intimacy for and with animals

We would welcome papers that deal with such issues in contemporary and historical settings, and would especially like to see papers that address these issues from contexts outside the UK, including the Global South. Papers are welcomed from across animal studies, including disciplines such as (but not limited to) geography, anthropology, sociology, literary studies, art history, history, science and technology studies, ethology, psychology, behavioural sciences and ecology.

Professor Erica Fudge, School of Humanities, University of Strathclyde, Lord Hope Building, Level 4, 141 St James Road, Glasgow G4 0LT

Persons as Animals conference @ Leeds

Online registration is now open for the Persons as Animals conference at Leeds, 6th-7th July 2016. Please visit our online store here to register, to see onsite accommodation options at Weetwood Hall, and to book your place at the conference dinner.

Please note that early bird registration rates apply until 6th May, after which a late fee will be charged.

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Conference details

This is the closing conference of the AHRC-funded project entitled ‘Persons as Animals: Understanding the Animal Bases of Agency, Perceptual Knowledge and Thought’, a project that aims to investigate ways in which a proper understanding of human beings as animals might help in resolving a range of philosophical problems which have traditionally been considered with little or no reference to our animal nature – in particular, the free will problem, epistemological scepticism about the external world, and the question of meaning. The project is being carried out in collaboration with the new ‘Islands project’ at Chester Zoo.

The following speakers have been confirmed:

(Keynote) Shaun Gallagher (University of Memphis)

Naomi Eilan (University of Warwick)

Ali Boyle (Cambridge University)

Denis Buehler (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)

Rory Madden (University College, London)

Filip Mattens (University of Leuven)

Andrew Moss (Chester Zoo)

Matthew Ratcliffe (University of Vienna)

Léa Salje (University of Leeds)

Helen Steward (University of Leeds)

***

Please direct any enquiries to Léa Salje at l.c.salje.

For further information about the Persons as Animals project at Leeds, please visit our website at http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/persons_as_animals.

Special Issue on Animal Politics

The latest issue of the journal Historical Social Research contains a special section on Animal Politics – A New Research Agenda in Political Theory, guest-edited by Svenja Ahlhaus and Peter Niesen.

Contents:
Introduction
Svenja Ahlhaus & Peter Niesen
What is Animal Politics? Outline of a New Research Agenda.

Contributions
Bernd Ladwig: Animal Rights – Politicised, but not Humanised. An Interest-Based Critique of Citizenship for Domesticated Animals.

Symposium: Zoopolis – A Political Theory of Animal Rights by Sue Donaldson
and Will Kymlicka
Thomas Saretzki: Taking Animals Seriously. Interpreting and Institutionalizing Human-Animal Relationships in Modern Democracies.
Tine Stein: Human Rights and Animal Rights. Differences Matter.
Sandra Seubert: Politics of Inclusion. Which Conception of Citizenship for Animals?

Johannes Marx & Christine Tiefensee: Of Animals, Robots and Men.
Andreas T. Schmidt: Why Animals have an Interest in Freedom.
Federico Zuolo: Equality among Animals and Religious Slaughter.
Karsten Nowrot: Animals at War. The Status of “Animal Soldiers” under International Humanitarian Law.

Abstracts can be found at
http://www.gesis.org/hsr/aktuelle-ausgaben/aktuelle-hefte/404-animal-politics/

‘Persons as Animals’, Leeds, 6th-7th July 2016

Conference announcement & CFP: ‘Persons as Animals’, Leeds, 6th-7th July 2016

*Apologies for cross posting*

This is a final call for submissions of extended abstracts on topics falling within the theme of the ‘Persons as Animals’ project based at Leeds University, for the project’s conference to be held in July next year.

The conference is linked to an AHRC Fellowship held by Professor Helen Steward, entitled ‘Persons as Animals: Understanding the Animal Bases of Agency, Perceptual Knowledge and Thought’. The project aims to investigate ways in which a proper understanding of human beings as animals might help in resolving a range of philosophical problems which have traditionally been considered with little or no reference to our animal nature – in particular, the free will problem, epistemological scepticism about the external world, and the question of meaning (how anything can come to stand for something else). The project is being carried out in collaboration with the new ‘Islands project’ at Chester Zoo.

We welcome submissions on any topic or topics of central relevance to an area of enquiry which falls within the project area, and that connects with the overall animalist orientation of the project. Examples might include: animal agency; motor intentionality; the role played by human habits and skills in an accurate account of human action; embodiment; non-visual forms of perception; embodied cognition; extended mind; but this list is by no means exhaustive.

Conference details

Dates 6th-7th July 2016

Location Weetwood Hall, Leeds

Confirmed speakers (Keynote) Shaun Gallagher (University of Memphis)

Naomi Eilan (University of Warwick)

Helen Steward (University of Leeds)

Matthew Rattcliffe (University of Vienna)

Rory Madden (University College London)

Léa Salje (University of Leeds)

Andrew Moss (Chester Zoo)

Submission details

Submission date 6th November 2015

Submission format Please send an extended abstract prepared for blind review of no longer than 1000 words to personsasanimals.

Unfortunately we have only a limited number of spaces for invited speakers, but will undertake to cover reasonable travel and accommodation expenses for them.

Please direct any enquiries to Léa Salje at l.c.salje.

For more information about the project, please visit our website: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/persons_as_animals

__._,_.___

‘Persons as Animals’, Leeds, 6th-7th July 2016

Conference announcement & CFP: ‘Persons as Animals’, Leeds, 6th-7th July 2016

*Apologies for cross posting*

This is a final call for submissions of extended abstracts on topics falling within the theme of the ‘Persons as Animals’ project based at Leeds University, for the project’s conference to be held in July next year.

The conference is linked to an AHRC Fellowship held by Professor Helen Steward, entitled ‘Persons as Animals: Understanding the Animal Bases of Agency, Perceptual Knowledge and Thought’. The project aims to investigate ways in which a proper understanding of human beings as animals might help in resolving a range of philosophical problems which have traditionally been considered with little or no reference to our animal nature – in particular, the free will problem, epistemological scepticism about the external world, and the question of meaning (how anything can come to stand for something else). The project is being carried out in collaboration with the new ‘Islands project’ at Chester Zoo.

We welcome submissions on any topic or topics of central relevance to an area of enquiry which falls within the project area, and that connects with the overall animalist orientation of the project. Examples might include: animal agency; motor intentionality; the role played by human habits and skills in an accurate account of human action; embodiment; non-visual forms of perception; embodied cognition; extended mind; but this list is by no means exhaustive.

Conference details

Dates 6th-7th July 2016

Location Weetwood Hall, Leeds

Confirmed speakers (Keynote) Shaun Gallagher (University of Memphis)

Naomi Eilan (University of Warwick)

Helen Steward (University of Leeds)

Matthew Rattcliffe (University of Vienna)

Rory Madden (University College London)

Léa Salje (University of Leeds)

Andrew Moss (Chester Zoo)

Submission details

Submission date 6th November 2015

Submission format Please send an extended abstract prepared for blind review of no longer than 1000 words to personsasanimals.

Unfortunately we have only a limited number of spaces for invited speakers, but will undertake to cover reasonable travel and accommodation expenses for them.

Please direct any enquiries to Léa Salje at l.c.salje.

For more information about the project, please visit our website: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/persons_as_animals

__._,_.___

Summer School @ Oxford: Helping people to think differently about animals

Helping people to think differently about animals
The Ethics of Eating Animals
24-27 July 2016 at St Stephen’s House, Oxford
Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics

The Summer School is being organised by the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics in partnership with the French animal society, One Voice.

Papers are invited in English and French from academics world-wide on any aspect relating to the ethics of eating animals, including philosophical and religious ethics, historical, legal, psychological, scientific, and sociological perspectives. Potential topics
include the morality of killing, the suffering of animals in food production, the portrayal of animals as meat, meat eating and climate change, the environmental impact of industrial farming, the utilisation of meat substitutes, in vitro meat and strategies
for change.

Abstracts of proposed contributions (no more than 300 words) should be sent (in English) to Clair Linzey via email: depdirector and (in French) to Muriel Arnal via email: muriel.arnal. The deadline for abstracts is 1 January 2016. Accepted papers will be considered for publication in a subsequent book volume or in the Journal of Animal Ethics.

The Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics was founded in 2006 and pioneers ethical perspectives on animals through academic research, teaching, and publication.

St Stephen’s House is an Anglican Theological College and a Hall of the University of Oxford.

Further information about the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics and the Summer School can be found at www.oxfordanimalethics.com. And more information about One Voice can be found at http://www.one-voice.fr/.

Conference: ‘Persons as Animals’, Leeds, 6th-7th July 2016

We are delighted to send this reminder about the forthcoming conference organised by the ‘Persons as Animals’ project based at Leeds University, and would like to invite submissions of extended abstracts on topics falling within the project’s themes.

The conference is linked to an AHRC Fellowship held by Professor Helen Steward, entitled ‘Persons as Animals: Understanding the Animal Bases of Agency, Perceptual Knowledge and Thought’. The project aims to investigate ways in which a proper understanding of human beings as animals might help in resolving a range of philosophical problems which have traditionally been considered with little or no reference to our animal nature – in particular, the free will problem, epistemological scepticism about the external world, and the question of meaning (how anything can come to stand for something else). The project is being carried out in collaboration with the new ‘Islands project’ at Chester Zoo.

We welcome submissions on any topic or topics of central relevance to an area of enquiry which falls within the project area, and that connects with the overall animalist orientation of the project. Examples might include: animal agency; motor intentionality; the role played by human habits and skills in an accurate account of human action; embodiment; non-visual forms of perception; embodied cognition; extended mind; but this list is by no means exhaustive.

Conference details

Dates 6th-7th July 2016

Location Weetwood Hall, Leeds

Confirmed speakers (Keynote) Shaun Gallagher (University of Memphis)

Helen Steward (University of Leeds)

Matthew Rattcliffe (University of Vienna)

Rory Madden (University College London)

Léa Salje (University of Leeds)

Andrew Moss (Chester Zoo)

Submission details

Submission date 6th November 2015

Submission format Please send an extended abstract prepared for blind review of no longer than 1000 words to personsasanimals.

Unfortunately we have only a limited number of spaces for invited speakers, but will undertake to cover reasonable travel and accommodation expenses for those speakers.

Please direct any enquiries to Léa Salje at l.c.salje.

For more information about the project, please visit our website: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/persons_as_animals

‘Persons as Animals’, Leeds, 6th-7th July 2016

We are delighted to announce a forthcoming conference organised by the ‘Persons as Animals’ project based at Leeds University, and would like to invite submissions of extended abstracts on topics falling within the project’s themes.

The conference is linked to an AHRC Fellowship held by Professor Helen Steward, entitled ‘Persons as Animals: Understanding the Animal Bases of Agency, Perceptual Knowledge and Thought’. The project aims to investigate ways in which a proper understanding of human beings as animals might help in resolving a range of philosophical problems which have traditionally been considered with little or no reference to our animal nature – in particular, the free will problem, epistemological scepticism about the external world, and the question of meaning (how anything can come to stand for something else). The project is being carried out in collaboration with the new ‘Islands project’ at Chester Zoo.

We welcome submissions on any topic or topics of central relevance to an area of enquiry which falls within the project area, and that connects with the overall animalist orientation of the project. Examples might include: animal agency; motor intentionality; the role played by human habits and skills in an accurate account of human action; embodiment; non-visual forms of perception; embodied cognition; extended mind; but this list is by no means exhaustive.

Conference details

Dates 6th-7th July 2016

Location Weetwood Hall, Leeds

Confirmed speakers (Keynote) Shaun Gallagher (University of Memphis)

Helen Steward (University of Leeds)

Matthew Rattcliffe (University of Vienna)

Rory Madden (University College London)

Léa Salje (University of Leeds)

Andrew Moss (Chester Zoo)

Submission details

Submission date 6th November 2015

Submission format Please send an extended abstract prepared for blind review of no longer than 1000 words to personsasanimals.

Webmaster Minding Animals
homepage

Sascha Benjamin Fink, Dr. des.
Institut für Philosophie
Universität Magdeburg
Zschokkestr. 32
39104 Magdeburg
Germany

Carol Adams mit Vortrag „The Sexual Politics of Meat“ in Wien (26. November 2015)

Carol J. Adams (USA), eine der weltweit führenden Ökofeministinnen, wird in Wien ihren international berühmten Vortrag "The Sexual Politics of Meat" halten. Ihr gleichnahmiger Bestseller (1990 erschienen) kommt im Herbst 2015 in der 25-jährigen Jubiläumsausgabe auf den Markt. Das Buch wurde in viele Sprachen übersetzt. Adams thematisiert darin auf eindrückliche Weise die oft ähnlichen Unterdrückungsmechanismen, die gegen Frauen und Tiere angewendet werden. Beiden liegen patriarchale Denkmuster zugrunde.

​Adams zentrale These ist, dass Tiere von den gegenwärtigen westlichen Kulturen zu „abwesenden Referenten" (absent referents) gemacht werden. Ihre Fragmente begegnen uns überall, besonders in Fleisch und anderen tierischen Produkten, aber die lebenden tierischen Subjekte sind in dieser Interaktion nicht mehr erkennbar: sie wurden objektifiziert (also ihrer Subjektivität enteignet und zu Objekten gemacht), fragmentiert (in Teile zerlegt und als ganze Subjekte unsichtbar gemacht) und konsumiert (als Produkte, in deren Logik sie Mittel zum Zweck sind und keinen eigenen inhärenten, von menschlichen Nutzungsinteressen unabhängigen Wert haben).

Diese Unterdrückungsstruktur gegenüber Tieren hat Ähnlichkeit mit der Unterdrückung und Gewalt gegenüber Frauen. Adams verbindet also Ideen der feministischen Ethik und der Tierethik in einem intersektionalistischen Ansatz der Kritik. Es wäre eine emanzipatorische Praxis, abwesende Referenten in Diskursen, Bildern und Interaktionen sichtbar zu machen. Dies kann über antisexistische und antispeziezistische Praktiken etwa beim Erstellen von Texten, Filmen usw. und in einer gelebten veganen Kultur geschehen.

​Der Vortrag findet auf Englisch statt (26.11.2015, 18 Uhr ct, Hörsaal B, Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien, Veterinärplatz 1; Anfahrt: U1 bis Kagraner Platz, dann 2 Stationen mit der Strassenbahn 25 bis Donaufelderstrasse/Veterinärmedizinische Universität).

Eintritt frei!

(jbs)


The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory explores the relationship between patriarchal values and meat eating by interweaving the insights of feminism, vegetarianism, animal defense, and literary theory. The New York Times called it “a bible of the vegan community”. This October, a twenty-fifth anniversary edition will be published by Bloomsbury.

Adams argues that male dominance and animals’ oppression are linked by the way that both women and animals function as absent referents, and that feminist theory logically contains a vegan critique…just as veganism covertly challenges patriarchal society. Patriarchy is a gender system that is implicit in human/animal relationships.

The concept of “the absent referent" means that behind every meal of meat is an absence: the death of the animal whose place the meat takes. The absent referent separates the meat eater from the animal and the animal from the end product. The function of the absent referent is to keep our "meat" separated from any idea that she or he was once an animal, to keep something from being seen as having been someone, to allow for the moral abandonment of another being. Adams shows how a process of objectification, fragmentation, and consumption enables the oppression of animals so that animals are rendered being-less through technology, language, and cultural representation.

The talk will be given in English (26.11.2015, 6.15 pm, Lecture Hall B, Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien, Veterinärplatz 1; Directions: U1 to Kagraner Platz, then two stops with tramway 25 to Donaufelderstrasse/Veterinärmedizinische Universität)

No entrance fee!

(jbs)

Critical Animal Studies: Call for book proposals

General Editors: Helena Pedersen and Vasile Stănescu

We are pleased to invite proposals for the book series, Critical Animal Studies, published by Brill. The main goals of the series, which differentiates it from the pre-existing series in the field of animal studies, are that we are particularly looking to publish works that:

(a) focus on ethical issues pertinent to actual animals (as opposed to animals as only metaphors, tropes, or philosophical concepts); i.e. work with a certain normative value;

(b) adopt a broad critical orientation to animal studies, including (but not limited to) work that investigates and challenges the complex dynamics of structural, institutional, and discursive power formations that organize life conditions, relations, and experiences of animals, humans, and the environment alike; work that explores diverse forms and sites of human/animal resistance; work that contributes to current global debates by contextualizing critical animal issues within, for instance, processes of globalization, climate change, and biotechnology; work that intervenes in the animal economy of the production, science, service, experience, and culture industries; as well as work that critically analyzes ideologies, practices and effects of the current animal welfare movement;

(c) bridge boundaries between academic/activist knowledge, between theory/practice, as well as between existing disciplines. Based on this commitment to interdisciplinarity, all work published must be in language that is as clear and accessible to as wide an audience as possible;

(d) contribute to creative, bold, innovative, and boundary shifting knowledge development in critical animal studies.

If we can be of any further help or assistance in discussing projects please do not hesitate to contact either of us via email. Further information and submission guidelines are found on the book series website: http://www.brill.com/products/series/critical-animal-studies

Sincerely yours,

Dr. Helena Pedersen
Co-Editor
Stockholm University
helena.pedersen

Dr. Vasile Stănescu
Co-Editor
Mercer University
vts123

Vethics for vets

Vethics for vets – Tierschutz und Tiermedizin
Tagung am 17. und 18. September 2015 im Festsaal der Veterinärmedizinischen Universität Wien.

An zwei Tagen werden ReferentInnen aus unterschiedlichen Fachrichtungen zum Thema Ethik und Veterinärmedizin vortragen und es wird Raum zu Diskussion und Austausch geboten.

Bei Interesse bitten wir um verbindliche Anmeldung bis Samstag, den 15. August 2015 unter vethics@vetmeduni.at (ohne Tagungsgebühren). Für die Teilnahme an den öffentlichen Abendvorträgen ist keine Anmeldung erforderlich.

Nähere Informationen werden unter https://www.vetmeduni.ac.at/de/messerli/forschung/forschung-ethik/projekte/vethics/internationale-tagung-vethics-for-vets/ bereit gestellt und laufend aktualisiert.

JU

Tagungsprogramm VETHICS.pdf

Buch: Thinking Through Animals – Identity, Difference, Indistinction von Matthew Calarco

The rapidly expanding field of critical animal studies now offers a myriad of theoretical and philosophical positions from which to choose. This timely book provides an overview and analysis of the most influential of these trends. Approachable and concise, it is intended for readers sympathetic to the project of changing our ways of thinking about and interacting with animals yet relatively new to the variety of philosophical ideas and figures in the discipline. It uses three rubrics—identity, difference, and indistinction—to differentiate three major paths of thought about animals. The identity approach aims to establish continuity among human beings and animals so as to grant animals equal access to the ethical and political community. The difference framework views the animal world as containing its own richly complex and differentiated modes of existence in order to allow for a more expansive ethical and political worldview. The indistinction approach argues that we should abandon the notion that humans are unique in order to explore new ways of conceiving human-animal relations. Each approach is interrogated for its relative strengths and weaknesses, with specific emphasis placed on the kinds of transformational potential it contains.

Matthew Calarco is Associate Professor of Philosophy at California State University, Fullerton.

„Concise, incisive, and written with exemplary clarity, this book provides all of the background necessary to understand the philosophical and political stakes of current debates around the status of animals in relation to humans. It will appeal to non-specialists and specialists alike.“—Brian Massumi, University of Montréal

„A major work of synthesis that makes sense of the already almost unsurveyable field of critical animal studies. Practical and pragmatic, yet carrying a strong theoretical punch, it will be a point of reference for future discussions in the field.“—Eduardo Mendieta, SUNY Stony Brook

„Surveying the disparate and sometimes rocky terrain of animal studies from Aristotle through Haraway with grace and insight, this little book synthesizes an abundance of material, movements, and positions in a breathtaking, not to mention extremely helpful, manner.“—Kelly Oliver, Vanderbilt University

Stanford University Press

June 2015 88pp 9780804794046 PB 9.99 GBP

http://www.combinedacademic.co.uk/thinking-through-animals

Workshop Ankündigung: Evidence for Animal Minds 2016

An Interdisciplinary Symposium

This three-day workshop, sponsored by Durham University’s Institute of Advanced Study as part of its 2015-16 Evidence theme, will examine the problem of evidence in accounting for the phenomenon of ‘animal minds’ – the existence and character of (broadly conceived) mental phenomena in non-human animals. This controversial question offers a rich case for exploring the meanings of ‘evidence’ from a range of disciplinary perspectives. For more detail see the project’s objectives and framework.

The symposium will take place in the Pemberton Building, Palace Green, Durham, DH1 3EP, on 18-20 April 2016. It will assemble philosophers of mind and of knowledge, experimental psychologists and ethologists, evolutionary biologists and biological anthropologists, neuroscientists and specialists in artificial intelligence, social anthropologists and historians of science, humanities scholars with expertise in visual culture and literature, as well as those working on relevant aspects of religious history and theology.

External speakers and discussants are likely to include: Kim Sterelny (Australian National University), Cecilia Heyes(Oxford), Mattei Candea (Cambridge), Nicky Clayton (Cambridge), Katie Slocombe (York), Amanda Seed (St Andrews), Alex Thornton (Exeter), Alex Mesoudi (Exeter), Kim Bard (Portsmouth), Dominic Dwyer (Cardiff), Candy Rowe (Newcastle), Melissa Bateson (Newcastle), and others.

Organisers: Dr Andy Byford (MLAC), Dr Rachel Kendal (Anthropology), Dr Anthony McGregor (Psychology).

Advisory committee: Professor Robert Barton (Anthropology), Professor Janet Stewart (MLAC), Professor David Herman (English), Dr Matthew Eddy (Philosophy), Professor Madeline Eacott (Psychology), Dr Benedict Douglas(Law), Professor Gary Marvin (Social Anthropology).

For further information contact: andy.byford or zoo.psy

USA beendet Schimpansenforschung

Der US Fish & Wildlife Service (FSW) hat klar gemacht, dass auch in Gefangenschaft lebende Schimpansen zu den bedrohten Tieren gehören. Dies war bisher nicht der Fall. Diese Entscheidung der FSW hat massive Auswirkungen auf alle Schimpansen, die derzeit noch in Wissenschaftsgehegen, Zoos und Zirkus gefangen gehalten werden. Es ist ab jetzt illegal, weitere Schimpansen zu importieren oder sie zu verletzen, zu schikanieren oder zu töten („harm, harass, kill [or] injure“). Die Entscheidung wird von Tierrechtlern befürwortet, einige Wissenschaftsgruppen wie die National Association for Biomedical Research kritisierten die Entscheidung hingegen. Es ist zu erwarten, dass Schimpansenforschung in naher Zukunft gänzlich aus dem US-Forschungsalltag verschwindet. (Quelle: Nature)

sbf

Animal Ethics Essay Prize on „The Suffering of Animals in Nature“

Animal Ethics invites submissions for the 1st Animal Ethics Essay Prize on the topic of the suffering of animals in nature and intervention in the wild: http://www.Animal-Ethics.org/1st-Essay-Prize. Animal Ethics is a nonprofit organization aimed at increasing concern and encouraging debate on the moral consideration of nonhuman animals in academia as well as among the general public.

The situation of animals in the wild is becoming a major issue in animal ethics today. Although according to a relatively common naïve view, animals in the wild live mostly good lives and natural processes are good simply because they are natural, there is increasing awareness that wild animals encounter many sources of suffering and early death, and that humans should acknowledge this as an object of moral concern.

Moreover, there are reasons to think the lives of most animals have more suffering than positive wellbeing. One reason for this is that most animals reproduce by having a huge number of offspring, while on average only one per parent survives. The others die shortly after coming into existence, often in painful ways, such as starvation or being killed by other animals. Their lives are so short that there is little wellbeing in them, while they include the suffering of the animals’ often painful and sometimes frightening deaths.

Although some human interventions in the wild can increase the harms animals suffer, many interventions can help to reduce them significantly. Many successful initiatives have already been implemented including wild animal rescues and vaccination and feeding programs. Other interventions on a larger scale may be developed as concern for nonhuman animals increases.

While this topic has often been neglected, the literature on it has been growing significantly in recent years. This prize aims to contribute to this by encouraging further research. We welcome submissions of unpublished essays up to 9,000 words, which are not under consideration with other journals. The winner will be awarded $1,500.

Essay topics may include:

· Estimates of the degree of sentience in animals (especially fishes and invertebrates) when they die, and studies in life history theory estimating the proportion that die shortly after coming into existence and at other ages.

· Case studies illustrating the structural causes of animals‘ suffering and early deaths in the wild.

· The relationship between sources of primary production and nutrient availability and nonhuman animal suffering.

· Factors affecting the predominance of r-strategists over K-strategists that can inform policies.

· Forms of intervention to help animals in the wild that do not cause more harm than good and that can be carried out effectively today on a small or medium scale.

· How large scale decisions or possible future trajectories could lead to greater or lesser amounts of harm for animals living in the wild.

· The development of welfare biology theory.

· Estimates of value and disvalue in the wild.

· Ethical arguments for intervention for the benefit of wild animals.

· Political theory and the issue of intervention to aid wild animals.

· Psychological reasons why people may not consider the harms wild animals suffer and support aiding them.

· How to increase research on these topics in academia.

· How to spread concern for wild animals and the idea that they should be helped, among the general public and animal advocates.

Since there are many possible topics, essays can have a wide range of approaches. Both strongly empirically-based and more speculative essays will be eligible for the prize. We welcome essays in natural science addressing applied welfare biology problems, in practical philosophy considering the arguments for helping animals in the wild, and in social science assessing how to better spread concern about this topic.

Contributions will be assessed with special consideration given to their potential impact, such as:

· Encouraging further academic work on the subjects of the suffering of wild animals and interventions in the wild.

· Increasing interest in the subjects among the general public and animal advocates.

· Informing policies aimed at reducing the harms that nonhuman animals suffer in the wild.

Contributions (in English) should be sent as email attachments to essay.prize (a ) animal-ethics . org, with the subject ‚Animals Ethics Essay Prize‘. Essays must not include self-identifying information. The author’s contact details and the name of the essay should appear only in the body of the email.

The deadline is December 15, 2015.

The winning essay will be chosen after a blind review process and announced during the first quarter of 2016. However, if none of the submitted essays meets an acceptable standard of quality, the prize will not be awarded.

If there are enough high quality submissions, authors will have the option of having their essays considered for inclusion in a book to be edited by Animal Ethics in which the winning essay will be published.

http://www.Animal-Ethics.org/1st-Essay-Prize

http://www.Animal-Ethics.org/fb

http://www.twitter.com/AnimalEthics

Tagung zur Ausstellung #catcontent, Freitag, 12. und Samstag, 13. Juni 2015, Kunstpalais Erlangen

Wie in der Kunst sind Tiere in den vergangenen Jahren immer stärker auch in das Zentrum der wissenschaftlichen Aufmerksamkeit
gerückt. Als junges interdisziplinäres Forschungsfeld haben sich aus dem englischsprachigen Wissenschaftsdiskurs die
Human-Animal Studies entwickelt, die die komplexen und vielfältigen Beziehungen zwischen Tier und Mensch in den Fokus
ihrer Betrachtungen nehmen. Die Tagung im Kunstpalais möchte einen Anstoß zur vertieften Auseinandersetzung mit der Handlungsmacht
von Tieren und dem Verhältnis zwischen Tier und Mensch bieten.
Die Teilnahme an der Tagung ist für alle Interessierten kostenfrei!
#Freitag, 12. Juni 2015
#17.30 Uhr Führung durch die Ausstellung mit Amely Deiss, Leiterin Kunstpalais*
#19 Uhr Abendvortrag
Prof. Dr. Volker Sommer (Professor für evolutionäre Anthropologie am University College London):
Wildes Denken. Wie Affen die Welt sehen
#Samstag, 13. Juni 2015
#10.00 Uhr Begrüßung
Amely Deiss, Leiterin Kunstpalais
Dr. Jessica Ullrich, Repräsentantin Minding Animals
Einführung
Ina Neddermeyer, Kuratorin der Ausstellung #catcontent
#10.30 Uhr Dr. Jessica Ullrich (Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin für Human-Animal Studies, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg):
Animal Agency und Animal Audience. Wie man den lebenden Tieren die Bilder erklärt
#11.15 Uhr Prof. Dr. Sabine Nessel und Carlo Thielmann, M.A. (Professorin und wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Institut für
Film-, Theater- und empirische Kulturwissenschaft, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz):
Tiere, die sprechen und fühlen. Sinnliche Konfigurationen des Filmtiers
#13.00 Uhr Führung durch die Ausstellung mit Kuratorin Ina Neddermeyer*
#14.00 Uhr Prof. Dr. Roland Borgards (Professor für Neuere Deutsche Literaturgeschichte an der Universität Würzburg):
Die Macht der Laus. Südseeimperialismus und Hoffmanns hawaiianische Haimatochare (1819)
#14.45 Uhr Prof. Dr. Mieke Roscher (Juniorprofessorin für Sozial- und Kulturgeschichte, Universität Kassel):
Machen Tiere nur „Scherereien“? – Alternative Lesarten von Animal Agency in historischen Quellen
#15.45 Uhr Prof. Dr. Markus Wild (Professor für Theoretische Philosophie, Universität Basel):
Tiere: Selbsterhaltung und Selbstdarstellung
#16.30 Uhr Dr. Colin Goldner (Klinischer Psychologe und Tierrechtsaktivist):
Persönlichkeitsrechte für Menschenaffen? Das Great Ape Project
#17.30 Uhr Podiumsdiskussion:
Handeln Tiere? Ethische Überlegungen zur Animal Agency
(mit: Dr. Arianna Ferrari, Forschungsbereichsleiterin Innovationsprozesse und Technikfolgen, Institut für Technikfolgenabschätzung und Systemanalyse,
Karlsruhe; Prof. Dr. Herwig Grimm, Professor am Messerli Forschungsinstitut, Wien, Leiter der Abteilung Ethik der Mensch-Tier-Beziehung; Dr. Aline
Steinbrecher, Oberassistentin am Historischen Seminar, Universität Zürich; Dr. Karsten Brensing, Meeresbiologe und Verhaltensforscher, Whale and Dolphin
Conservation)
Moderation: Dr. Judith Benz-Schwarzburg (Universitätsassistentin Messerli Forschungsinstitut, Wien, Abteilung Ethik der Mensch-Tier-Beziehung)
#20.00 Uhr Gesprächskonzert:
Prof. Dr. Martin Ullrich (Präsident der Hochschule für Musik Nürnberg):
Vögel, Kühe und Musik: Das zoosemiotische Klavier
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Ausstellung URBAN SPECIES in Hamburg

Vom 16.10. – 18.10. präsentieren wir unter dem Themenschwerpunkt URBAN SPECIES Künstler aus den nordischen Ländern und aus Deutschland, die sich in ihren Arbeiten mit dem Spannungsverhältnis zwischen Stadt und Land, zwischen Mensch und Tier, zwischen Natürlichem und Künstlichem auseinandersetzen. Wieviel Natur ist dem Menschen heilig, wieviel Technologie ist zum Leben heute nötig? Wo weist die Natur urbane Strukturen auf, wo wirken unverfälschte Instinkte im städtischen Leben? Wie dünn ist die Grenze zwischen Zivilisation und Wildheit und wer hat die Macht? Zum Programm gehören Performances, Installationen, Filme, Skulpturen, Vorträge und Präsentationen. URBAN SPECIES ist eine Veranstaltung des Nordwind Festivals mit Kampnagel.

Weitere Infos unter: http://www.kampnagel.de/urban-species/
Kampnagel Internationale Kulturfabrik GmbH
Jarrestraße 20
22303 Hamburg

Vorlesungsreihe in Berlin des Chimaira Arbeitskreise

Am 15.Oktober 2014 startet die Vortragsreihe des Chimaira Arbeitskreis
für Human-Animal Studies in Berlin Von Tieren und Menschen, Grenzen und
Widerständen. Neue Perspektiven auf gesellschaftliche
Mensch-Tier-Verhältnisse.
Die thematisch breit gefächerten Vorträge
finden alle zwei Wochen im Mehringhof (Gneisenaustr. 2a, 10961 Berlin)
statt und beginnen um 19 Uhr. Der Eintritt ist frei. Programm findet sich hier.